Science dating sites

I ended up back at bachelorhood after a long and expensive trek through computer-aided love services; I decided to look for love on the Internet mainly to test the hypothesis behind a blistering 50-page critique of hyped up promise of dating websites.

A team led by Elizabeth Bruch, a sociologist at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, tapped into this torrent of dating data.

Because of a nondisclosure agreement, the researchers can't reveal the exact source of their subjects, describing it only as an "established, marriage-oriented, subscription-based dating site" from which they randomly selected 1855 people, all based in New York City.

Besides photographs, each user's profile could include any number of personal details including age, height, weight, education, marital status, number of children, and smoking and drinking habits.

The data set includes some 1.1 million interactions between users.

Those 30 million people have generated billions of pieces of data.

And because most dating sites ask users to give consent for their data to be used for research purposes, this online courting has played out like an enormous social science experiment, recording people's moment-by-moment interactions and judgments.

For example, if you prefer blondes, but really have nothing against brunettes and redheads, then you can rank that attribute as very low.

If it’s very important to you that your date has a college degree, you can rank that very high.

Then the site will match you with highly educated brunette sooner than a blonde who didn't finish high school.

Some sites use very complex personality surveys and mathematical algorithms to match partners.

In dating sites, science-based online dating sites are those pair-matching websites that claim to use “science”, such as chemistry, genetics, psychology, or the scientific method, etc., to match up potential couples.

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